What Is The White Stuff That Comes Out Of Keratosis Pilaris?

How common is keratosis pilaris?

Keratosis pilaris affects nearly 50-80% of all adolescents and approximately 40% of adults.

It is frequently noted in otherwise asymptomatic patients visiting dermatologists for other conditions.

Most people with keratosis pilaris are unaware the condition has a designated medical term or that it is treatable..

What happens if you pick at keratosis pilaris?

The area of your skin that is affected by keratosis pilaris may become darker (hyperpigmentation) or lighter (hypopigmentation) than the surrounding skin. This can happen if you scratch or pick at the bumps.

What vitamins help with keratosis pilaris?

The use of topical moisturizers, salicylic acid, lactic acid, urea, vitamin D, or tretinoin may be of benefit, but the plugs usually reappear when treatment is discontinued. The condition has a connection to vitamin A deficiency, so supplementation with small amounts of vitamin A may help.

How do you exfoliate with keratosis pilaris?

Exfoliate gently. When you exfoliate your skin, you remove the dead skin cells from the surface. You can slough off these dead cells gently with a loofah, buff puff, or rough washcloth. Avoid scrubbing your skin, which tends to irritate the skin and worsen keratosis pilaris.

Can diet improve keratosis pilaris?

Some people say cutting out dairy or sugar has improved their rash. In general, consuming an anti-inflammatory diet may be of benefit and is not harmful but there are no studies to say an anti-inflammatory diet improves keratosis pilaris.

Should you pop keratosis pilaris?

Keratin plugs don’t usually require medical treatment. However, it’s understandable to want to get rid of them for aesthetic reasons, especially if they’re located in a visible area of your body. First, it’s important to never pick at, scratch, or attempt to pop keratin plugs. Doing so may only cause irritation.

What triggers keratosis pilaris?

We get keratosis pilaris when dead skin cells clog our pores. A pore is also called a hair follicle. Every hair on our body grows out of a hair follicle, so we have thousands of hair follicles. When dead skin cells clog many hair follicles, you feel the rough, dry patches of keratosis pilaris.

Is Cetaphil good for keratosis pilaris?

Mild cases of keratosis pilaris may be improved with basic lubrication using over-the-counter moisturizer lotions such as Cetaphil, Purpose, or Lubriderm.

Does keratosis pilaris look like whiteheads?

The hallmark of KP is patches of small, rough, pimple-like bumps on the skin, according to Lee. It’s caused by excessive production of a protein called keratin, which builds up until it plugs hair follicles (a.k.a. the pores) and causes those bumps to form.

What should I avoid with keratosis pilaris?

Keratosis pilaris happens from a buildup of keratin in the pores. A quick search on the internet reveals blogs of people who have cleared up their keratosis pilaris by altering their diet. Some eliminate gluten from their diet. Others avoid spices, oils, and milk.

Is keratosis pilaris a vitamin deficiency?

Keratosis pilaris (KP) may be associated with phrynoderma (vitamin A deficiency). Interestingly, a significant association has also been found between acquired ichthyosis and keratosis pilaris as common cutaneous manifestations in persons with type 1 diabetes.

Can keratosis pilaris spread?

Keratosis pilaris is not contagious. People do not give it to someone else through skin contact and do not catch it from anyone else. Some people are simply more prone to developing keratosis pilaris because of genetics and skin type.

Does coconut oil help KP?

Coconut oil is naturally rich in lauric acid. Lauric acid helps in breaking up the access build of keratin. Keratin, as you know, is the major cause of KP as it clogs the hair follicles –leading to the formation of the rough and small bumps.

Can keratosis pilaris be white?

Keratosis pilaris is a benign (not harmful) skin condition that looks like small bumps. If you have this condition, you may notice small, painless bumps on your skin around the hair follicles. These bumps may have a red, brown or white color — they can also be skin-colored.

How do you remove sebum plugs?

Nazarian recommends exfoliating with topical medications, such as glycolic acid, retinoids, and salicylic acid, to break down the plugs and dissolve them. Eventually, your pores will refill, so like a game of Whac-a-Mole, those sebaceous filaments will pop right back up, requiring you to be consistent in your routine.

What gets rid of keratosis pilaris?

Keratosis pilaris home remediesTake warm baths. Taking short, warm baths can help to unclog and loosen pores. … Exfoliate. Daily exfoliation can help improve the appearance of the skin. … Apply hydrating lotion. … Avoid tight clothes. … Use humidifiers.

What’s the best lotion for keratosis pilaris?

The Best Keratosis Pilaris TreatmentsSA Lotion for Rough & Bumpy Skin. CeraVe amazon.com. … Best for Dry Skin. AmLactin Daily Moisturizing Body Lotion. … NeoStrata Lotion Plus AHA 15. NeoStrata dermstore.com. … KP Exfoliating Wash. Touch amazon.com. … Great for the Face. … KP Duty. … The Body Exfoliator. … Resurface+ AHA Renewing Body Cream.More items…•Mar 15, 2021